Sin Entered The World

Sunday, September 26, 2021

Does the story of the fall surprise you? How could Adam and Eve—who had everything they needed—rebel against a loving God? Do you think you would have acted differently? 

Adam and Eve’s story is our story. Think about the last time you blatantly sinned. What lies were you believing in that moment? Satan wants us to believe the same lie that Eve believed: Maybe God is holding out on me. Maybe He isn’t good or loving. Maybe I would do a better job than Him. Do you ever wonder if you know better than God?

Before the fall, Adam and Eve enjoyed a loving, two-way relationship with God. The garden was a true paradise. God filled the garden with good gifts so that they might enjoy them and give Him thanks. This glorifies God. All of that changed when Adam and Eve gave in to the serpent’s temptation.

Adam and Eve desired something more: the wisdom the fruit offered. But when their eyes were opened, they didn’t get what they hoped for. Instead, they were aware of their nakedness. They felt ashamed. Surely the Lord’s heart broke at their act of disobedience and rebellion. Can you think of a time your own sin produced regret and sorrow?

Because of their sin, God cast Adam and Eve out of the garden. Though they did not die right away, sin’s effect was immediate and thorough. Their lives and their children’s lives—and the lives of all of humanity—would be forever affected by their choice. We see this in the world around us. We experience God’s grace, but we are very aware that the world is broken. It was not meant to be this way.

Sin is a big problem that needs a big solution. At just the right time, God sent His Son into the world, born as a baby. Matthew 1:21 says, “You are to name him Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins.” 

As your kids become increasingly aware of the bad news—that we are all sinners from birth—rejoice with them over the good news: “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners” (1 Tim. 1:15).

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: God planned to send Jesus to make everything right. 
  • Younger Preschool: Since Adam and Eve, all people have been sinners. God sent Jesus to rescue us from sin.
  • Older Preschool: Everything was different after Adam and Eve sinned. Since then, all people have been sinners. Sin keeps us from God, but God never stops loving us. He sent His Son, Jesus, to rescue people from sin and bring them back to God.
  • Kids: Ever since Adam and Eve sinned, all people have been born as sinners. Sin separates us from God, but God still loves us. God promised a Rescuer would come from Eve’s family. God sent His Son, Jesus, to rescue people from sin and bring them back to God.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: What does it mean to sin? We sin when we disobey God.
  • Older Preschool: What does it mean to sin? To sin is to go against God and His commands.
  • Kids: What does it mean to sin? To sin is to think, speak, or behave in any way that goes against God and His commands.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: We all make wrong choices. — Romans 3:23
  • Younger Preschool: Everyone makes wrong choices. — Romans 3:23
  • Older Preschool: All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. — Romans 3:23
  • Kids: For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. — Romans 3:23

** Next week: Sin Spread to People (Genesis 4–5)

People Rebel Against God

Sunday, October 17, 2021

We love to measure the health, success, or sustainability of pretty much anything and everything. We measure our kids by their grades in school. We measure teams by their wins and losses. We measure people by their influence and following on social media. In a world obsessed with measuring “success,” we ought to be assessing in our own lives something we cannot see: our motivation. 

We can define motivation simply as the reason we do something. Motivation is the driving force behind the decisions we make. There is a reason for everything that we do—both big and small—but what that motivation is might not be obvious to those around us.

In Genesis 11, Noah’s family had grown and began to rebuild the earth’s population. At some point along the way, they decided to ignore God’s command to spread out and subdue the earth for God’s glory. Instead, the people decided to build a tower to show their greatness. Their motivation was both obvious and arrogant.

Read Psalm 127:1-2. These verses provide a blatant reminder that God is the only true builder. His glory is our only proper motivation. Additionally, this psalm gives us a promise that those who love God will be able to rest from being driven by selfish motivation. 

Doesn’t it sound pretty attractive to be able to rest from selfish motivation that plagues so much of our thinking and behavior? In God’s economy, He’s less worried with the outcome of our decisions and more concerned with the reason for our decisions. That’s not to say that it doesn’t matter what we do. Rather, if our motivation is right—if our hearts are right—our actions will follow. And not only will our motivation and behavior honor God, but much of the anxiety of life will fade away too.

When was the last time you measured your motivation? Is the driving force behind what you do making a name for yourself, your kids, or even your church? Or is the primary desire driving your life boasting in the name of Christ? Read Psalm 127:1 again. May we be driven by God’s glory and not our own.

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: People will worship Jesus. 
  • Younger Preschool: People disobeyed God, so God mixed up their language and spread the people over the earth. One day, Jesus will bring His people back together. People from every language will worship Him together.
  • Older Preschool: People tried to make themselves famous instead of God. God mixed up their language so the people spread out over the earth. One day, Jesus will bring His people back together. People from every group and language will worship Him together.
  • Kids: People wanted glory for themselves instead of God. They ignored God’s plan, so God confused their language and scattered them all over the earth. One day, Jesus will gather together all of God’s people—from every tribe and language—and they will worship Him together.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: What does it mean to sin? We sin when we disobey God.
  • Older Preschool: What does it mean to sin? To sin is to go against God and His commands.
  • Kids: What does it mean to sin? To sin is to think, speak, or behave in any way that goes against God and His commands.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: We all make wrong choices. — Romans 3:23
  • Younger Preschool: Everyone makes wrong choices. — Romans 3:23
  • Older Preschool: All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. — Romans 3:23
  • Kids: For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. — Romans 3:23

** Next week: God Made a Covenant with Abraham (Genesis 12–20)

Sin Spread to People

Sunday, October 3, 2021

Siblings often fight and compete as children and even adults. It may be over something as innocent as who gets the last cookie or as serious as who inherits their parents’ prized heirloom. 

The competition Cain felt toward Abel—the world’s first siblings—reminds us that these family tensions can cause great damage to our relationships with one another, with parents, and even with God. 

In the story of Cain and Abel, we find a progressing pattern of jealousy, which leads to hatred, which leads to murder. The result is not one but two lost sons for Adam and Eve.  

God’s disregard of Cain’s offering stirred an intense jealousy and anger within Cain. Cain raged not only because his offering was rejected by God, but also because his brother’s offering was accepted by the Lord. Cain’s jealousy led him into a pit of misdirected hatred of Abel, ultimately leading him to murder his brother. The consequence of sin—death—that God had warned Adam and Eve about had come to fruition.

Jealousy never produces anything godly in us. And why is that? It’s primarily because jealousy is nothing more than proof that we have staked our identity on what we have done or can do, rather than on what God has done for us through Christ. 

When you are tempted to compare yourself to others, let that trigger a reminder of who you are in Christ. 

Second Corinthians 5:17 tells us that “if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation.” As a child of God, our identity is not dependent upon what we do, but instead upon what Christ has done to save us through His life, death, and resurrection. Rather than living in the comparison between ourselves and others, let’s live in the confidence that we have been made new. In Christ, we are fully loved and accepted. 

Fight the temptation to compare. Fight the urge to compete with others before God. And trust in the finished work of Christ. For you are not your own; you were bought with a price. And that price is one you could never repay.

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: God promised to send Jesus. 
  • Younger Preschool: Everyone in Adam and Eve’s family sinned too. God promised to send His Son, Jesus, to save sinners.
  • Older Preschool: Adam and Eve’s sin spread to their family. But God did not forget His promise to send a Rescuer. At just the right time, God would send His Son to save sinners.
  • Kids: Adam and Eve’s sin and its consequences spread to all of their descendants. But God did not forget His promise to send a Rescuer. At just the right time, God would send His Son to save sinners.

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: What does it mean to sin? We sin when we disobey God.
  • Older Preschool: What does it mean to sin? To sin is to go against God and His commands.
  • Kids: What does it mean to sin? To sin is to think, speak, or behave in any way that goes against God and His commands.

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers: We all make wrong choices. — Romans 3:23
  • Younger Preschool: Everyone makes wrong choices. — Romans 3:23
  • Older Preschool: All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. — Romans 3:23
  • Kids: For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. — Romans 3:23

** Next week: God Spared Noah (Genesis 6–10)

The Walls Rebuilt

Sunday, February 9, 2020

Nehemiah was a Jew living in Persia. He served as the king’s cupbearer. When the Persian Empire conquered the Babylonians, King Cyrus allowed God’s people to return to Judah. Two or three million Jews had originally been deported, but only a remnant—50,000 people—returned. They set up their homes and rebuilt the temple in Jerusalem.

But when God’s people faced opposition in rebuilding the rest of Jerusalem, they stopped. Some 70 years passed, and the walls and gates around the city were still ruined.

City walls and gates were very important in Bible times. Thick walls protected a city from its enemies and provided a sense of safety and security. Gates were the center of city life, the meeting place for commercial and social transactions. Without these structures, the surviving remnant of God’s people struggled and was vulnerable to attack.

Nehemiah traveled from Persia to Jerusalem to lead the effort in rebuilding Jerusalem’s walls. His leadership was effective. Nehemiah 3 describes all the people working together to rebuild the gates and walls. But it wasn’t long before Nehemiah met opposition from local governors. God’s people armed themselves and kept working. They completed the wall in just 52 days.

Note how their enemies reacted: “All the surrounding nations were intimidated and lost their confidence, for they realized that this task had been accomplished by our God” (Neh. 6:16).

Now God’s people were protected from their enemies. Help your kids see that God provided the way for us to be protected from our enemies, sin and death: He sent His Son, Jesus, to die on the cross for our sins. When we repent and trust in Jesus, He frees us from sin and death. We still sin, but we are no longer slaves to sin. (See Rom. 6:17-18.) We may die a physical death as a result of sin, but we have eternal life. (See John 11:25-26; Rom. 6:23.)

Nehemiah led the people to rebuild the walls around Jerusalem to protect them from their enemies. Jesus came to protect us from our greatest enemy, sin and death. He died on the cross and rose from the dead to rescue everyone who trusts in Him.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

  • Babies and Toddlers
  • ○ Nothing can stop God’s good plan.
  • ○ Jesus protects us from our enemies.
  • ○ Nehemiah led the people to rebuild Jerusalem’s walls.
  • ○ God kept His people safe as they worked.
  • ○ Jesus keeps us safe from sin when we trust in Him.
  • Preschool
  • ○ Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything.
  • ○ Nehemiah led God’s people to rebuild the walls.
  • Kids
  • ○ Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything in heaven and on earth. 
  • ○ God used Nehemiah to rebuild Jerusalem’s walls.

UNIT KEY PASSAGE

  • 1 Peter 5:10

NEXT WEEK 

  • “God’s People Repented” (Nehemiah 8–13)

The Captives Came Home

Sunday, January 12, 2020

God’s people had been living in Babylon for 70 years. Some of God’s people had died in Babylon. Some of their children and grandchildren were born in Babylon and grew up there. But Babylon was not their home.

Before the people of Judah were exiled, God had spoken through the prophet Jeremiah. These are the words of the Lord: “These nations will serve the king of Babylon for seventy years” (Jer. 25:11). Then the Lord said, “When seventy years for Babylon are complete, I will attend to you and will confirm my promise concerning you to restore you to this place” (Jer. 29:10). The time had come for God’s people to go back home.

Cyrus, the king of the Persian empire, had overthrown Babylon. Cyrus took over the kingdom, including the lands of Israel and Judah. In the following year, the Lord did something miraculous in Cyrus’s heart. He prompted Cyrus to issue a decree: All the Jewish exiles are free to return to their ancestral homes.

The exile was over! God’s people were free to return to their own land. They were free to live as God’s special people. The first group of Judean exiles returned home under the leadership of Zerubbabel (zuh RUHB uh buhl). Zerubbabel was the grandson of King Jehoiachin, who had been taken to Babylon by King Nebuchadnezzar. (See 2 Kings 24:8-13.)

Ezra 2:64-65 says nearly 50,000 people traveled back to Judah. When they got to Jerusalem, they began working to rebuild the temple that the Chaldeans had destroyed. (See 2 Chron. 36:19.)

Explain to your kids that the temple was the place where God met with His people. Jesus came to earth to rescue God’s people from sin. When Jesus returns, He will restore the earth and will dwell with His people forever.

Zerubbabel led God’s people back to the temple to rebuild it. The temple was the place where God met with His people on earth. Jesus came to earth to rescue God’s people. One day Jesus will return to restore a greater home for all of God’s people, and we will spend eternity with Him.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

  • Babies and Toddlers
    • The prophets told about Jesus.
    • Jesus will give us a home with Him.
    • God brought His people back to their land.
    • Zerubbabel led the people to build the temple.
    • Jesus brings us to God.
  • Preschool
    • How is Jesus the perfect Prophet? God speaks to us through Jesus.
    • God kept His promise to bring His people home.
  • Kids
    • How is Jesus the perfect Prophet? Jesus perfectly reveals God the Father and fulfills what the prophets spoke. 
    • God kept His promise to bring His people home.

UNIT KEY PASSAGE

Jeremiah 29:11

NEXT WEEK 

“The Temple Was Rebuilt” (Ezra 4–6; Haggai)

The Captives Came Home

Sunday, January 12, 2020

In the first two sessions of this unit, we have seen a common thread of God’s glory. God created everything, including people, to display His glory. In this session, we want to make sure that our kids understand what that means. What is God’s glory? 

God’s glory can be thought of as God’s greatness. The Bible often uses the picture of a brilliant white light when it comes to God’s glory. When Moses came down from Mount Sinai after spending time with God, his face shone. When Jesus was transfigured, He shined like a brilliant white light. And when Paul encountered Jesus on the road to Damascus, he saw a blinding light. Such an intense light helps us understand how pure and powerful God’s glory is. 

But we don’t just see God’s glory revealed in bright light. In this session, we looked at a Psalm that King David wrote many years after Adam and Eve. David used creation to speak of God’s glory. For David, it was easy to see God’s glory—at least its fingerprints—all around him.

If you have ever looked up into the heavens on a clear, dark night, maybe you have sensed it too as you consider all the stars that cannot be counted and think that each is a giant sun, like ours—only our sun is relatively modest in comparison—and that they stretch over billions and billions and trillions and trillions of miles. And that is just what we can see! 

Or maybe you have caught a glimpse of God’s glory as you looked over a stunning mountain range or walked on a beach. Creation is full of beauty, wonder, and power—all of which hints at the greater beauty, wonder, and power of the Creator who made it all. God is glorious indeed. 

But one of the greatest ways we can know of God’s glory is that the Creator who made everything not only made us too, but wants to have a friendship with us. That is why He gave us the Bible—so that we might come to know Him, love Him, and live for Him. 

As you talk with your kids, seek to leave them in awe of how big and how good and how loving God is. 

Check out The Gospel Project At Home for resources designed to help you lead a family worship experience as well as suggestions for morning and evening prayer times and family activities.

FAMILY TALKING POINTS

CHRIST CONNECTION

This is the big idea of how this week’s Bible story points to Jesus.

  • Babies & Toddlers: All creation shows God is great.
  • Younger Preschool: All of creation shows how great God is. Jesus is God. Jesus is the best way we can know how great God is.
  • Older Preschool: All of creation shows how great God is. Jesus is God. Jesus is the best way we can know how great God is.
  • Kids: All of creation displays the glory of God—how great He is—although not perfectly. The perfect revelation of God’s glory is found in Jesus, who came to show us exactly what God is like. Because Jesus is God, He is the perfect display of God’s glory. 

BIG PICTURE QUESTION & ANSWER

This is an important biblical truth that your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Younger Preschool: Why did God create everything? God created everything to show He is great.
  • Older Preschool: Why did God create everything? God created everything for His glory.
  • Kids: Why did God create everything? God created everything for His glory and our good. 

KEY PASSAGE

This is a Bible verse that relates to what your child will encounter each week of this unit. 

  • Babies & Toddlers:The heavens show God is great! — Psalm 19:1
  • Younger Preschool: The heavens show God is great! — Psalm 19:1
  • Older Preschool: The heavens declare the glory of God, and the expanse proclaims the work of his hands. — Psalm 19:1 
  • Kids: The heavens declare the glory of God, and the expanse proclaims the work of his hands. — Psalm 19:1

** Next week: Sin Entered the World (Genesis 3)

Esther Saved Her People

Sunday, February 2, 2020

The Babylonian captivity ended when Cyrus, the king of Persia, took over Babylon and let God’s people go home. Some of God’s people—now called Jews (people from Judah)—traveled back to Judah to rebuild the temple, the city, and their lives. Others, however, stayed in Persia where life among the pagans was relatively comfortable.

The king of Persia was now Ahasuerus (uh haz yoo EHR uhs), also known by his Greek name, Xerxes (ZUHRK seez). Esther was a young Jewish girl who became queen of Persia. The former queen had defied the king and was promptly replaced.

Esther had been an orphan, so her cousin Mordecai adopted her. Mordecai kept in touch with Esther while she lived in the palace. One day, the king gave Haman the Agagite a very important position in the kingdom. The king even commanded the people to bow down to Haman. But Mordecai refused.

Haman was a descendant of Agag, king of the Amalekites. The nations of Israel and Amalek did not get along. Haman was angry, but instead of just punishing Mordecai, he planned to kill all the Jews in the kingdom.

In this week’s Bible story, Mordecai turned to Esther for help. After all, she was in a position of power, and the Jews were her people. The stakes were high, but Esther approached the king and explained her people’s plight. Review the details in Esther 7.

Note how Esther described Haman: “The adversary and enemy is this evil Haman” (Esth. 7:6). We too have an adversary—the Devil. He prowls around like a lion, seeking people to devour. (1 Pet. 5:8) He loves nothing more than to destroy believers and hinder the work of God. Satan thought he had succeeded when Jesus died on the cross, but God—working frequently behind the scenes—raised Jesus from the dead and defeated Satan once and for all. (See Heb. 2:14-15.)

God was in control over Haman’s evil plan to destroy the Jews. Like Haman, Satan wants to ruin God’s plan and destroy believers. Satan thought he had won when Jesus died on the cross, but God raised Jesus from the dead and defeated Satan once and for all. All who believe in Jesus are rescued from sin and death.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

  • Babies and Toddlers
    • ○ Nothing can stop God’s good plan.
    • ○ Jesus died and rose again to do God’s plan.
    • ○ God made Esther queen of Persia.
    • ○ God used Esther to rescue His people.
    • ○ Jesus rescues us from sin and death.
    • Preschool
    • ○ Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything.
    • ○ God used Esther to rescue God’s people from their enemies.
    • Kids
    • ○ Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything in heaven and on earth. 
    • ○ God made Esther a queen to protect His people.

UNIT KEY PASSAGE

  • 1 Peter 5:10

NEXT WEEK 

  • “The Walls Rebuilt” (Nehemiah 1–6)

Malachi the Prophet

Sunday, February 23, 2020

After many years living as prisoners in Babylon, God’s people had returned to Judah. They had worked hard and overcome opposition to rebuild the temple and the walls around Jerusalem. Surely God would restore them … finally! But nothing happened. As they waited, they faced drought and economic uncertainty. God’s people probably didn’t feel like God had blessed them at all.

“It is useless to serve God,” they said. “What have we gained by keeping his requirements?” (Mal. 3:14). Did God still care? It wasn’t long until God’s people fell back into the same patterns of sin that led to their exile in the first place: idolatry, covetousness, hypocrisy, arrogance, and abuse of the poor.

But God did still love His people. He had been working out His divine plan of redemption, and He never gave up on them. God sent a message to His people through the prophet Malachi.

Malachi was the last of the Old Testament prophets. He spoke to God’s people approximately 100 years after the end of the Babylonian captivity. Malachi’s message from God was a wake-up call.

God communicated through Malachi that the people’s lack of blessing didn’t mean that God didn’t care. God exposed His people’s sin and made clear that their actions merited a curse. God’s people needed to repent and turn back to God. “But for you who fear my name,” God said, “the sun of righteousness will rise with healing in its wings” (Mal. 4:2).

Explain to your kids that 400 years of silence followed Malachi’s prophecy; God did not communicate to His people. This period brings us to the New Testament, when the silence would be broken by the last prophet before Jesus, John the Baptist. His words about Jesus in John 1:29 offered hope to all who heard: “Here is the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!”

Malachi was a messenger—a prophet—who told God’s people to repent. Malachi also told about another messenger God would send. This messenger, John the Baptist, would call people to repent and get them ready for a final Messenger, Jesus Christ. Jesus would bring good news of salvation.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

  • Babies and Toddlers
  • ○ Nothing can stop God’s good plan.
  • ○ Jesus came to give us good news.
  • ○ Malachi told people God’s words.
  • ○ God promised to send a messenger before the Messiah.
  • ○ Jesus is God’s Son, the Messiah.
  • Preschool
  • ○ Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything.
  • ○ Malachi said a messenger would get people ready for the Messiah.
  • Kids
  • ○ Who is in control of everything? God is in control of everything in heaven and on earth. 
  • ○ Malachi called God’s people to repent to prepare for the Messiah.

UNIT KEY PASSAGE

  • 1 Peter 5:10

NEXT WEEK 

  • “From Adam to Jesus” (Matthew 1; Luke 3; John 1)

From Adam to Jesus

Sunday, March 1, 2020

The prophecies concerning Jesus’ birth are numerous, and many of them refer to Jesus’ lineage. Old Testament prophecies tell of the promised Messiah being born from the seed of a woman (Gen. 3:15); from the seed of Abraham (Gen. 22:18), Isaac (Gen. 21:12), and Jacob (Num. 24:17); from the tribe of Judah (Micah 5:2); from the line of Jesse (Isa. 11:1); and from the house of David (Jer. 23:5). The prophecies said He would be born of a virgin (Isa. 7:14) and would be the Son of God (1 Chron. 17:13-14; Ps. 2:7). Jesus fulfilled all of these prophecies.

In Bible times, Jews took great care to record family genealogies accurately. The family a person belonged to was directly linked to property rights. Matthew 1:1-17 and Luke 3:23-38 both chronicle the genealogy of Jesus. The account in Matthew presents Jesus as the king of the Jews—the legal heir to the throne of David. The account in Luke was written to Greek Christians and focuses on Jesus’ descent from Adam.

Jesus was born as a baby in Bethlehem. He had earthly parents—Mary and Joseph—but His true Father is God. Jesus is fully God and fully man.

As fully God, “the entire fullness of God’s nature dwells bodily in Christ” (Col. 2:9). As fully man, Jesus has a human body, human mind, and human emotions. (See Luke 2:7,52; Matt. 26:38.) He is our sinless representative (2 Cor. 5:21), sympathetic high priest (Heb. 4:15), and substitute sacrifice (1 John 4:10).

Use this Bible story to review Jesus’ ancestors and their stories in the Old Testament. Help your kids recognize that God had been working out His plan to send Jesus over hundreds of years—through Adam, Abraham, Isaac, Rahab, Ruth, David, and others. God sent His Son to earth to save people from their sins.

Jesus came to earth as a human. Jesus had earthly parents, Mary and Joseph, but His true Father is God. Through Jesus, God kept His promises to Abraham and David. Jesus saves people from their sins and adopts them into God’s family.

Check this session’s Activity Page for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

  • Babies and Toddlers
    • ○ Jesus rescues us and makes us part of God’s family.
    • ○ There is no one like Jesus.
    • ○ God promised to send Jesus to earth.
    • ○ Jesus is God’s Son, and Jesus is a man.
    • ○ God sent Jesus like He promised.
  • Preschool
    • ○ Jesus had a family.
    • ○ Is Jesus God or a human? Jesus is both fully God and fully human.
  • Kids
    • ○ Jesus’ family line proved He is the Messiah. 
    • ○ Is Jesus God or a human? As the Son of God, Jesus is both fully God and fully human.
  • UNIT KEY PASSAGE
  • John 1:1-2 (Preschool: John 1:1)
  • NEXT WEEK 
  • “John Was Born” (Luke 1)

John Was Born

Sunday, March 8, 2020

Some of the last words of the Lord recorded in the Old Testament are found in Malachi 4—“Look, I am going to send you the prophet Elijah … he will turn the hearts of fathers to their children and the hearts of children to their fathers” (vv. 5-6). The Book of Malachi was written more than 400 years before Jesus was born. For centuries, God’s people did not hear from Him. They were back in their homeland but were subject to other ruling nations. Eventually, the Romans took over.

The Roman emperor installed Herod as a leader over Judea and surrounding regions such as Samaria and Galilee. To gain the people’s favor, King Herod replaced Zerubbabel’s temple in Jerusalem with a beautiful marble temple constructed by 10,000 workers. This was the temple in which Zechariah, a priest from the family of Abijah, served the Lord. This was the temple in which God, through the angel Gabriel, broke His silence after so many years.

Zechariah and his wife, Elizabeth, were both “righteous in God’s sight” (Luke 1:6), living by faith in God’s promise to send a Messiah. Like Abraham and Sarah in Genesis 18, they were getting along in years and did not have any children. Elizabeth’s barrenness was a point of disgrace for her among the community (Luke 1:25) and God graciously answered this couple’s prayers.

An angel appeared to Zechariah in the temple sanctuary and delivered good news: “Your prayer has been heard. Your wife Elizabeth will bear a son.” Echoing Malachi’s prophecy, the angel declared this son would “turn the hearts of fathers to their children” (Luke 1:17)

For his doubting, Zechariah was rendered mute until the promise came to pass. When Zechariah believed God’s word, he praised God. John was born to prepare the way for Jesus. John would point people to Jesus, and they would praise God for keeping His promise to send the Savior.

Check this session’s Activity Page for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

  • Babies and Toddlers
    • ○ We can praise God for sending Jesus.
    • ○ There is no one like Jesus..
    • ○ An angel told Zechariah that Elizabeth would have a baby.
    • ○ John was born to get people ready for Jesus.
    • ○ Zechariah praised God for His plan to rescue people.
  • Preschool
    • ○ John was born to get people ready for Jesus.
    • ○ Is Jesus God or a human? Jesus is both fully God and fully human.
  • Kids
    • ○ John was born to prepare the way for Jesus.
    • ○ Is Jesus God or a human? As the Son of God, Jesus is both fully God and fully human.
  • UNIT KEY PASSAGE
  • John 1:1-2 (Preschool: John 1:1)
  • NEXT WEEK 
  • “Jesus Was Born” (Luke 2)